You have just received your first telescope and you are eager to try it out. Various astronomers and photographers who love viewing the galaxy have also known this feeling of joy mixed with excitement!. The universe beckons you to try and discover more of it through your newly acquired telescope. The universe has an array of objects that you can explore, and being a beginner, you should not find any hindrance in your quest to explore. If you have a telescope or binoculars, then you are a step away from starting to explore. You only need to step out at night and see what is in store for you. The objects discussed here are easy to find and their size makes it easy for a pair of binoculars, reflectors, refractors, and catadioptric telescopes to view them. Even with the presence of the full moon, you absolutely have no reason to not view the galaxy.

The Moon

A clear shot of the round moon
A clear shot of the round moon

It is always fascinating to view the moon at any time of the year. Many astronomers believe that the moon can be seen at its best, only during its full phase. However, this is not quite true. Actually, the best time to view the moon is when its visible size is a quarter of its circle, or even slightly less than that. Sunlight comes from each side and the moon has features that cast spacious shadows causing your telescope to have a plastic view. The most interesting angle to view the moon is along the edges and also the Terminator which is the line that forms the confluence of the illuminated areas. An interesting fact about the moon is that it was first formed when a planet that had a similar size to that of Mars, crashed into the earth. There were fragments that orbited the earth after the crash, and this is what formed the moon. The dark areas that we see today are the Maria, a name curved from the Latin for ‘sea’. Hurry up and view the moon to enjoy more interesting sites of the surface of the moon.

Jupiter

Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system
Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system

Of all the orbiting bodies that make up the solar system, Jupiter is the largest. It is a planet that is usually very bright and mesmerizing to view. Regardless of the size of the telescope that you have, you will be able to see the four largest moons of Jupiter: Io, Europa, Gannymede and Callisto, as well as its others. With the number of moons belonging to Jupiter often in question, it is reassuring to know that these 4 Galilean satellites, with their Shakespearean names, are ever constant companions of this mighty gas giant. If the weather allows, it is possible to view some cloud bands, and if you have a larger scope, you will be able to look on fabulous detail of those clouds, as well as the famous red spot. Have fun as you draw the moons’ positions as you trace their paths over a given period of time!

Saturn

Saturn with its big & fascinating ring
Saturn with its big & fascinating ring

This is known to be the most enigmatic planet. Once you view its rings for the first time, you will be inspired to find out more. The distance from Saturn to the sun is double that of Jupiter’s. This means, therefore, that Saturn receives a very meager amount of light. Even though Saturn is bigger than Jupiter in physical diameter, its farther distance causes it to be viewed more faintly. And it is a great feat when you do see it! Do not try to increase the magnification of your lenses, however, since you will end up having multiple disturbances. If you have perfect eyesight, make sure that you use a magnification that ranges from 100 to 150.

If your telescope is very small or the viewing conditions are not perfect, you will see Saturn’s rings like small ears. As a matter of fact, this is the exact view that Galileo saw when he viewed Saturn through the use of his telescope. He concluded that the “ears” must have been two small moons located on each side of the planet. After a period of 2 years, the ‘moons’ disappeared, and then later, reappeared. It has since been understood that the disappearance of the ‘moons’ was caused by viewing the planet from the ring edge.

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